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AGOA in Nigeria: Nigerian-American Chamber of Commerce’s Policy Advocacy and Network Mechanism, 2000-2010

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ABSTRACT

Nigerian-American trade relations took a new dimension when the American government domesticated the WTO trade liberalisation in support of economic growth in the sub-Saharan Africa by signing into law the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) in May, 2000. AGOA posed new challenges to the Nigerian private sector; the first was setting the enabling environment through legislations. Not much of the private sector input in facilitating trade relationship between the two nations under AGOA is documented. What is well known are the objectives and contents of AGOA; its conditionalities and benefits; and that Nigeria was one of the eligible nations. This paper sets out to examine AGOA and the Nigerian-American Chamber of Commerce’s advocacy in setting the enabling commercial environment for global trade and business networking under AGOA between 2000 and 2010.  It is a study in bilateral trade and investment relations from the perspective of the private sector.

READ  Okuntola, AGOA (2013)

The Rise and Fall of Egba Independence

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ABSTRACT

This paper revisits scholarly accounts of the rise and fall of Abeokuta’s sovereignty and independence. It argues that existing literature on Abeokuta excessively privileges British activities and colonial power without commensurate attention to the interplay of local identities and their interests. It demonstrates that the Adubi revolt of 1914 was not singularly targeted at the British, but was the outcome of struggles among Egba rulers. These struggles can be traced way back to the 19th century during which the Egba state was founded and grew to dominate its region.

 READ Davies, The Rise and Fall (2013

Non-Alignment in Nigeria’s Foreign Relations, 1960-1979: A Comparative Analysis of Precept, Praxis and Motivational Factors

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ABSTRACT It is usually argued that while Nigeria’s foreign policy under the administration of Abubakar Tafawa Balewa was ‘aligned’, under the military administrations that succeeded it, it was non-aligned. The notion of non-alignment usually employed to sustain this conclusion is the equidistant: that Nigeria ought to have maintained equal distance between the Soviet Union and the United States. This notion is not only idealistic, the conclusion, particularly as it pertains to the Balewa administration, erected on it is far-fetched. The paper suggests the deployment of a historically informed perspective by which the conception of non-alignment adopted should be that projected by these administrations; in this case, non-alignment was a diplomatic strategy for the preservation and enhancement of Nigeria’s sovereignty in the face of the imperialism of the Cold War powers. However, even though there has been a continuity of official meaning for non-alignment, its actual manifestation between 1960 and 1979 has been dependent more on the personality of the particular head of state and the perception of rather than actual or objective factors as the strength of the economy. It thus appears valid to conclude that the level of assertiveness of Nigeria’s international behaviour corresponded to the degree of assertiveness of the personality of Nigeria’s heads of state.   READ Ifidon- Non-Alignment2013

Identity and Solidarity in a Yoruba Diaspora: The Egba Omo Oduduwa in Northern Nigeria1948-1966

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ABSTRACT

This paper explores how ethnicity and associational life constitute salient features of inter-group relations and politics in Nigeria. The formation of Egbe Omo Oduduwa in 1948 marked a turning point in inter-group relations and IN the phenomenon of nativism or ethnic nationalism in Nigeria. Yoruba migrants in northern Nigeria established branches of the Egbe Omo Oduduwa which rapidly reshaped their interaction with the Hausa/Fulani host communities and other migrants as well. It accelerated the process of ethnic suspicion and hostility that partly culminated in the military putsch of 1966 and ended the first Republic. The research project on the activities of Egbe Omo Oduduwa was carried out in northern Nigerian towns of Zaria, Kaduna, Kano, Sokoto, Katsina and Funtua due to their economic and political significance. Social and political activities of the Egbe in these selected towns were explored. The formation of the Egbe in many parts of northern Nigeria influenced and promoted Yoruba identity which in some ways insulated them from the Hausa/Fulani host communities. This paper discusses the nature of migrant/settler relations and its consequences on the Nigeria’s national politics. READ Olaniyi, Egbe Omo Oduduwa